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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
. number two, as bill clinton and president obama point out, the math doesn't add up when you're trying to do this just on deductions. you need to do both deductions and loopholes and, of course, raise the rate. that's the only way the math works. and as far as hurt the economy, let me say for the 10,000th time, bill clinton raised tax rates on the top 2% in 1993 and we then proceeded to grow the economy by 23 million jobs. so, that's a bunch of bull, speaker boehner. >> let's go back to alex with the same question. i will argue that even though he hasn't specified the deductions or the loopholes he's going to close, the governor is right, there isn't enough at the top to close to make up for this advantage they have now but it seems he's accepting the moral argument. he's saying, the rich should get socked, too. that was an amazing admission for him to say to that. your thoughts. >> i agree with you. the fact that john boehner is out there saying we are asking the rich to pay more in taxes is not something they ever would have done in 2011. if you remember, math by details in the sitdo
that rate to 39.6% where it was during the clinton administration. what else is in this new gop proposal? >> reporter: let's show you some of the savings when it comes to government spending. first of all, they put about $600 billion in what the republicans are calling health savings. we understand -- we don't have details. we understand much of that comes from medicare, things that we've heard from republicans over and over like raising the eligibility age, means testing, things like that. so then we have about $600 billion in essentially spending cuts, half from mandatory spending, half from discretionary spending. this is the other very interesting thing that's new. $200 billion from revising the consumer price index. that sounds very technical. but it has very real world consequences because it very much could affect the money, the checks that social security recipients in particular get every single month because it effectively changes inflation so it changes the formula from what they would get. >> significant differences between the white house proposal on this part of the equatio
the federal budget deficit. he knows something about something. he was around when clinton -- remember that economy? okay. he said i wish president obama and the democrats would explain to the nation the federal budget deficit isn't the major problem and deficit reduction shouldn't be the major goal. problem is lack of good jobs and the goal must to be revive both. deficit reduction leads us away from jobs and growth. the reason the fiscal cliff is dangerous is because it's too much deficit reduction too quickly that would suck demand out of the economy. more jobs and growth will help the deficit. recall the '90s when the clinton administration balanced the budget because of faster job growth than anybody expected bringing in more tax revenues than anyone had forecast. europe offers the same lesson in reverse. thank you. as jim says, every time we talk about this, they keep taking the wrong -- lindsey graham said we're going to be greece. yeah, if we do what you want! the best way to generate jobs and growth is
of state hillary clinton said farewell to nato allies during a visit to brussels. as she contemplates the future, she may well be encouraged by a new washington post poll. asked if they would vote for her if she ran for president in 2016, 57% said yes while 37% said no. joining us is our white house correspondent kristen welker. we found out the editor of "the new yorker" said hillary clinton would run in 2016 and dustin hoffman would support her if she ran but what chatter are you hearing around the white house about that? >> reporter: democratic sources tell me the secretary of state just hasn't decided yet. she's still in the process of mulling over this decision. having said that, they also tell me that the political operation is doing what they need to do to preserve the right to run if that's what she decides to do in 2016. that's playing out behind the scenes. publicly we've seen this unfold for quite some time. her president, former president bill clinton, was president obama's key surrogate during this election cycle, setting the stage for president obama to return the favor
to happen within the next couple weeks. hillary clinton is going to soon be stepping down from secretary of state. leon panetta does not plan to stay on for president obama. although there's fuzziness around that. and the nation needs a cia director post-david petraeus. now president obama may announce his pick for defense secretary within the next couple weeks and he may make it in a high-powered package announcement along with his choice for secretary of state. so all these jobs coming up, state, defense, cia, all will need to be confirmed by the senate and will be announced maybe at once and before christmas. maybe this is the time to have the debate about the way our national security is run. the debate we did not necessarily have before we started making big fundamental changes to that system that mostly just still get discussed behind closed doors. joining us now is senator claire mccaskill, chair of the support subcommittee. thank you for being here. >> it's great to be here. >> you and i have had a lot of interesting conversations over the years about national security. in part,
committee following a leadership of chairman clinton. we are in a tight schedule and 5 like to call up senator kc. i would be remiss if i did not recognize the presence here today of lieutenant-colonel larry lerlach. he was commander of an amphibious unit in lebanon. in october of 1983 hezbollah terrorists drove two trucks and exploded the american and french marine barracks. he survived it, 241 american women did not. he is here today with us. we thank you so much for your service and honoring us. [applause] >> welcome again to the foundation for defense of democracy's annual washington forum. my name is kenneth schwartz. i have the pleasure of introducing distinguished public official robert kc, senior senator from the state of pennsylvania. you served since 2007 as chairman of near east and south asia subcommittee, senate foreign relations committee only in the first term. one can scarcely imagine a more challenging time, the past two years in the middle east have seen wars in international borders, collapse of regimes in decades and the rise of political movements that may yet turn
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)